Somehow, it’s the middle of October…holy cow! This unprecedented start to the school year is like nothing we’ve ever experienced and certainly not something we’ll soon forget (even though we might want to!). It’s also provided educators opportunities to provide virtual learning solutions and PE teachers opportunities to provide virtual physical education. The initial shock of going virtual last spring was met with great efforts, collaboration, and many tireless hours by dedicated educators! It was nothing short of amazing to see how the PE community responded to what most initially thought was just going to be a “band-aid” for a few weeks…little did we know what the summer and fall were going to bring…

As the summer progressed and the start of school loomed closer and closer, the “band-aid” started looking more like a need for long term solutions.  As districts waivered back and forth and held off on decisions to start back in person, remote, or hybrid, educators were forced to plan for all three!  Slowly but surely (and at the last minute for some) and more districts started making decisions to continue virtual education, including virtual physical education.

And again, the PE community stepped up to provide outstanding tools, templates, resources, and support to provide the best opportunities we could for the young people we serve.  We’ve learned new ways to plan lessons, how use Zoom (and other virtual meeting platforms), and how to become master video editors! We’ve also realized that regardless of delivery, some things about PE are the same!

With time, effort, trial & error, and countless dedicated hours, we found a way to make it work.  We in a continued effort to share, collaborate, and support one another, asked a handful of those dedicated physical educators to reflect on their experiences in a virtual physical education environment, where they struggled, where they succeeded, and how they have grown from this experience!

The following are the reflections on virtual physical education from Dana Curby @evanslivefit, Bailee Sandsmark @coachsandsmark, Chris Tamez @tamez209, Derrick Biehl @MrBiehlsPE, and Chad Aubin @ChadAubin. Complete bios and contact information from each of these dynamite physical educators can be found at the bottom of this post!

So here we go! Five questions – reflecting on virtual physical education!

What was the most intimidating thing you experienced leading up to virtual physical education? How did you manage that?

Dana

The most intimidating thing was the idea of getting kids out from behind their computers and getting them moving.  We found that with parents/guardians being stuck at home as well, many kids were getting outside and doing things already. We just wanted them to record what they were doing.  Unfortunately, we didn’t have a huge response from our students because they knew even if they didn’t do the work their grades could not be negatively impacted.  I feel as if they were doing more active things than normal but just not recording them. So, as we started this year, I was extremely concerned we wouldn’t have great participation.  We knew we needed to revamp things to make it work. Fortunately, I have an extremely great group of co-workers who came together and created a different type of agenda that still puts the responsibility on the kids but allows us to be a more integral part of their learning.

Bailee

The most intimidating thing leading up to virtual physical education is no training on how to teach this way. We received a lot of training on a variety of tools and different learning management systems and platforms, but actually teaching virtually is something I wasn’t sure about. It’s a daily adjustment of reflecting on what went well and what can be done better to best serve my kids. Collaborating with colleagues both at my school site and with friends in other schools and districts has been huge in helping learn how to navigate virtual teaching.

Chris

The most intimidating thing I experienced with virtual physical education was the uncertainty. There are many variables I cannot control such as space, equipment, time, environment, etc. The way I learned to overcome that is worry about what I can control which is content and delivery. By keeping students engaged through this process the learning loss might not be as bad pertaining to PE. Some may do physical activity every day and some may not but if they are least engaged when you see them during zoom class then hopefully some of the material will stick with them.

Derrick

The most intimidating thing was all the unknown. The unknown of what platform we were using, the unknown of what our schedule would look like, the unknown of whether all students would get devices or not, and the unknown of how long we will be teaching virtually. As someone who likes to properly plan/prep, it was extremely tough to prepare for coming back to school. I tried to stay on top of preparing for the fall by working with Physical Educators across the country through Zoom to create resources & spark ideas of how we can teach Quality PE virtually, face to face (socially distanced), and in a hybrid model. We met every couple of weeks through Zoom and tried to learn the new information each state was putting out. Then we broke up into groups to try and create lessons that could inspire teachers to keep the “education” in Physical Education.

Chad

I really like routines. Heading into virtual learning, obviously there was not a clear routine in regards to the flow of class, schedule of activities, etc. My colleagues and I did a good amount of planning and prep together, which I think helped us all feel more confident in our plans as the school year started.

The most intimidating thing was the idea of getting kids out from behind their computers and getting them moving.  We found that with parents/guardians being stuck at home as well, many kids were getting outside and doing things already. We just wanted them to record what they were doing.  Unfortunately, we didn’t have a huge response from our students because they knew even if they didn’t do the work their grades could not be negatively impacted.  I feel as if they were doing more active things than normal but just not recording them. So, as we started this year, I was extremely concerned we wouldn’t have great participation.  We knew we needed to revamp things to make it work. Fortunately, I have an extremely great group of co-workers who came together and created a different type of agenda that still puts the responsibility on the kids but allows us to be a more integral part of their learning.

Dana

The most intimidating thing leading up to virtual physical education is no training on how to teach this way. We received a lot of training on a variety of tools and different learning management systems and platforms, but actually teaching virtually is something I wasn’t sure about. It’s a daily adjustment of reflecting on what went well and what can be done better to best serve my kids. Collaborating with colleagues both at my school site and with friends in other schools and districts has been huge in helping learn how to navigate virtual teaching.

Bailee

The most intimidating thing I experienced was the uncertainty. There are many variables I cannot control such as space, equipment, time, environment, etc. The way I learned to overcome that is worry about what I can control which is content and delivery. By keeping students engaged through this process the learning loss might not be as bad pertaining to PE. Some may do physical activity every day and some may not but if they are least engaged when you see them during zoom class then hopefully some of the material will stick with them.

Chris

The most intimidating thing about virtual physical education was all the unknown. The unknown of what platform we were using, the unknown of what our schedule would look like, the unknown of whether all students would get devices or not, and the unknown of how long we will be teaching virtually. As someone who likes to properly plan/prep, it was extremely tough to prepare for coming back to school. I tried to stay on top of preparing for the fall by working with Physical Educators across the country through Zoom to create resources & spark ideas of how we can teach Quality PE virtually, face to face (socially distanced), and in a hybrid model. We met every couple of weeks through Zoom and tried to learn the new information each state was putting out. Then we broke up into groups to try and create lessons that could inspire teachers to keep the “education” in Physical Education.

Derrick

I really like routines. Heading into virtual learning, obviously there was not a clear routine in regards to the flow of class, schedule of activities, etc. My colleagues and I did a good amount of planning and prep together, which I think helped us all feel more confident in our plans as the school year started.

Chad

What has been the biggest challenge for you throughout virtual instruction? How have you adapted to that challenge?

Dana

The biggest challenge we have had through virtual instruction has been initially getting everyone online.  We have the top of the socioeconomic group as well as the bottom. This initially created a gap of the haves and have nots.  Our guidance department, as well as our administration, worked extremely hard to make sure all students were able to participate in our online classes.  I have had to be a little more lenient and more responsive, if that was possible, to continue to help our students.  I still have deadlines and cut offs, otherwise I would be working on week 1 stuff still at this point, but I do accept more assignments when students are making an attempt to be responsible.  Because of this I have had to create more opportunities for students to communicate with me.  We use Google Classroom, E-mail, chats in E-mail, chat in our Google Meet, as well as Nod in our Google Meets. All these avenues allow the students to not only verbally ask questions but gives them access to me in whatever way is convenient for them.

Bailee

The biggest challenge would be knowing if I’m reaching all of my students. When in person, it is easy to tell which kids are learning and which aren’t.  With virtual learning, and many kids unable to have their cameras on, I’m not able to do visual checks for understanding.  I have used Flipgrid a lot, so that students feel like they are safe in sharing their learning and growth and this allows me to see where they are in their learning journey. I also feel so disconnected to the kids. To combat this, I am doing a quarterly meeting with each kid, to check in and chat with them. Not only has this helped me feel more connected to them, I have found that after just one meeting, I have so much more buy in from the kids!

Chris

The biggest challenge has been complete engagement. To overcome this, I have created exit tickets for students to fill out after completion of the activity. Although it’s not perfect, I am getting more and more participation as we progress throughout the year. Battling the tech issues has been tough as well. Not every student cannot submit a video or a picture of the completed activity and while I was stressing out about that, I figured out a way to put accountability back on them. I told my students that I do not have a way to visually see if you have done the activities or not but when we get back to school we are going to assess the skills that we went over during distance learning and if you guys do not pass the assessments then we have to go over them again and not get into game play so if you want to play games when we get back you better practice the skills now when they are assigned.

Derrick

The biggest challenge for Virtual P.E. has to be the logistics behind it all. I teach over 500 students in 2 schools, which comes out to be 20 different sections. Between creating new curriculum, keeping track of posting new assignments, giving meaningful feedback, and keeping an open communication with families it has been extremely tough to manage. I’ve been doing my best to stay organized by using Technology to my advantage. Before Covid-19 I was big into using Tech while teaching by already creating slideshows for my curriculum and presenting it while the students are in the gym. It was constantly on display and students could use the projector to reinforce ideas and concepts we’ve been learning about. Being familiar with using Google Slides already gave more time to dive deeper into Google Classroom. Using their features to schedule assignments, make copies of slides for each student, grade assignments automatically, and organize units into topics makes the logistics behind Virtual P.E. manageable.

Chad

I really like routines. Heading into virtual learning, obviously there was not a clear routine in regards to the flow of class, schedule of activities, etc. My colleagues and I did a good amount of planning and prep together, which I think helped us all feel more confident in our plans as the school year started.

The most intimidating thing was the idea of getting kids out from behind their computers and getting them moving.  We found that with parents/guardians being stuck at home as well, many kids were getting outside and doing things already. We just wanted them to record what they were doing.  Unfortunately, we didn’t have a huge response from our students because they knew even if they didn’t do the work their grades could not be negatively impacted.  I feel as if they were doing more active things than normal but just not recording them. So, as we started this year, I was extremely concerned we wouldn’t have great participation.  We knew we needed to revamp things to make it work. Fortunately, I have an extremely great group of co-workers who came together and created a different type of agenda that still puts the responsibility on the kids but allows us to be a more integral part of their learning.

Dana

The most intimidating thing leading up to virtual physical education is no training on how to teach this way. We received a lot of training on a variety of tools and different learning management systems and platforms, but actually teaching virtually is something I wasn’t sure about. It’s a daily adjustment of reflecting on what went well and what can be done better to best serve my kids. Collaborating with colleagues both at my school site and with friends in other schools and districts has been huge in helping learn how to navigate virtual teaching.

Bailee

The most intimidating thing I experienced was the uncertainty. There are many variables I cannot control such as space, equipment, time, environment, etc. The way I learned to overcome that is worry about what I can control which is content and delivery. By keeping students engaged through this process the learning loss might not be as bad pertaining to PE. Some may do physical activity every day and some may not but if they are least engaged when you see them during zoom class then hopefully some of the material will stick with them.

Chris

The most intimidating thing was all the unknown. The unknown of what platform we were using, the unknown of what our schedule would look like, the unknown of whether all students would get devices or not, and the unknown of how long we will be teaching virtually. As someone who likes to properly plan/prep, it was extremely tough to prepare for coming back to school. I tried to stay on top of preparing for the fall by working with Physical Educators across the country through Zoom to create resources & spark ideas of how we can teach Quality PE virtually, face to face (socially distanced), and in a hybrid model. We met every couple of weeks through Zoom and tried to learn the new information each state was putting out. Then we broke up into groups to try and create lessons that could inspire teachers to keep the “education” in Physical Education.

Derrick

I really like routines. Heading into virtual learning, obviously there was not a clear routine in regards to the flow of class, schedule of activities, etc. My colleagues and I did a good amount of planning and prep together, which I think helped us all feel more confident in our plans as the school year started.

Chad

We often have great ideas…but unfortunately, they are just that…great IDEAS that didn’t quite pan out the way we hoped. Did you have any thoughts/ideas/plans that you thought were going to be great but didn’t turn out?

Dana

Well of course we all have ideas that turn in to something else. I just like that all of us have had some ideas. It’s hard to work with folks who do not bring any ideas to the table. We initially thought we would teach by the Grid method in which students could move at their own pace, especially when we thought we would be in a Hybrid model. I thought students could come in on days they were in person and work on curriculum, ask questions, and practice skills. On days they were at home they could work on the cognitive portion of our curriculum. Then we quickly moved to all remote learning to start. It was like all the wind was taken out of my sails.

Bailee

My first real virtual unit was a juggling unit. The kids are struggling to juggle even two objects, let alone three. And knowing that they will be assessed on it makes them have even more anxiety about learning it. I have tried multiple ways of teaching and encouraged them to search YouTube or other people they know to see if they can find another way to learn that works better for them. We have tried using a variety of objects to juggle with, also, and even that doesn’t help. I’ve also gotten emails from parents saying their kids are breaking things around the house, despite me emphasizing having a clear space and using objects that won’t break other things…

Chris

My great idea was to get every students equipment but then I thought of all off the issue that could happen. Fortunately, we have the money in the budget to do this, but my admin brought up a good point. This time right now is temporary. We could use the money for that but what about when we come back? I was a good idea, but he made me realize that playing the long game was a better one.

Derrick

This is something that hits home for me. I constantly want to try new ways to engage students in my lesson through new technology, but unfortunately it doesn’t always work the way I plan. (Especially on the first try). For our “Community Building” unit: our goal was to learn about each other virtually through activities and I planned to do a Flipgrid Assignment where students would introduce themselves, say some of their favorite things, and explain how they keep themselves well. It seemed like a great idea that was simple and easy enough to do for all of K-5 and I’ve done similar assignments with 3-5 in the past with ease. Unfortunately, it added a lot of stress on my kindergarten families. Many had issues because they’ve never used Flipgrid before and had so much other new technology to learn that they felt overwhelmed. After many individual emails, screen recordings, and contact with students/families I realized that I needed to slowly roll out new technology in order for students and families to be successful.

Chad

My first time using breakout rooms did not work out very well. Students did not know each other well enough or want to talk and my expectations for discussion were way too high to begin with. I obtained some feedback from my students and was able to make some changes to make them a more positive experience.

Well of course we all have ideas that turn in to something else. I just like that all of us have had some ideas. It’s hard to work with folks who do not bring any ideas to the table. We initially thought we would teach by the Grid method in which students could move at their own pace, especially when we thought we would be in a Hybrid model. I thought students could come in on days they were in person and work on curriculum, ask questions, and practice skills. On days they were at home they could work on the cognitive portion of our curriculum. Then we quickly moved to all remote learning to start. It was like all the wind was taken out of my sails.

Dana

My first real virtual unit was a juggling unit. The kids are struggling to juggle even two objects, let alone three. And knowing that they will be assessed on it makes them have even more anxiety about learning it. I have tried multiple ways of teaching and encouraged them to search YouTube or other people they know to see if they can find another way to learn that works better for them. We have tried using a variety of objects to juggle with, also, and even that doesn’t help. I’ve also gotten emails from parents saying their kids are breaking things around the house, despite me emphasizing having a clear space and using objects that won’t break other things…

Bailee

My great idea was to get every students equipment but then I thought of all off the issue that could happen. Fortunately, we have the money in the budget to do this, but my admin brought up a good point. This time right now is temporary. We could use the money for that but what about when we come back? I was a good idea, but he made me realize that playing the long game was a better one.

Chris

This is something that hits home for me. I constantly want to try new ways to engage students in my lesson through new technology, but unfortunately it doesn’t always work the way I plan. (Especially on the first try). For our “Community Building” unit: our goal was to learn about each other virtually through activities and I planned to do a Flipgrid Assignment where students would introduce themselves, say some of their favorite things, and explain how they keep themselves well. It seemed like a great idea that was simple and easy enough to do for all of K-5 and I’ve done similar assignments with 3-5 in the past with ease. Unfortunately, it added a lot of stress on my kindergarten families. Many had issues because they’ve never used Flipgrid before and had so much other new technology to learn that they felt overwhelmed. After many individual emails, screen recordings, and contact with students/families I realized that I needed to slowly roll out new technology in order for students and families to be successful.

Derrick

My first time using breakout rooms did not work out very well. Students did not know each other well enough or want to talk and my expectations for discussion were way too high to begin with. I obtained some feedback from my students and was able to make some changes to make them a more positive experience.

Chad

On the flip side, what is an example of a “success story” from your time teaching virtual PE?

Dana

I believe the students are very happy to see us. I never imagined not seeing their faces for so long and when we just stop and have a pretty generic conversation at the beginning or end of class it draws them into the class. Along with this I had an 8th grade student who I never imagined to ever log in show up to start. He flipped out during an email which let me know exactly how he was feeling, and we were able to give him some help. I have continued to reach out to remind him that people really do care how he is doing. Also, Twitter has become my best resource for different ideas. I never thought Twitter would be a resource for teaching. However, this goes to show how education is changing. It shows us what the kids need to be ready for as we move out into the work world. There is definitely something to be said for face to face but as we see how easy it is to work remotely, I see our future changing as these students move out into the big world!

Bailee

I started greeting each kid as they enter class and calling them by name, “Welcome Susie, I’m happy to see you today.”. I also play music as they come in that is upbeat and fun. I think that the combination of the two start my class off with some movement and with the kids feeling like they are seen, and I am happy to see them in class. I also try to find funny “dad jokes”, fun sports or health stats, and inspirational videos for them right when class starts to make it something light and fun for them to think about and engage with. I’ve also thrown in some 60 second skill challenges to get students up and moving and laughing during class. They serve as a nice break in “learning” but still allows me to talk about different skills and give students opportunities to share what they found to help them be successful.

Chris

We have been able to implement nutrition education much more this year. With some kids moving less and dealing with social-emotional issues, proper diet can play a huge role on how the deal with those issues. Students have been able to gain a better understanding of how proper nutrition can affect their physical activity. When they have proper nutrition, they can be active longer which means the likelihood they will be able to better function in the classroom.

Derrick

The best moment so far of Virtual P.E. was an email I received from a parent of a student with special needs at my school…I try my best to modify activities/lessons to meet the needs of all my students so they can all feel included in Physical Education Class, but now that it is virtual it is even tougher. During our Community Building unit I mentioned earlier: I received an email from a parent of a student, and the part of the email that stuck out was “The All about me slide was an interesting project as I needed to represent them as another regular fourth grader – it made me realize that they have interests that are not solely special needs territory. The Flipgrid assignment was daunting to even think about as they do not always give full sentences, let alone three! But we worked on it all evening, practicing the lines and I submitted the first recording! Never mind the bad lighting and mom hovering in the background, it gives me hope to push through. I know these are no biggies in the regular course of things, but these are like BIG in our world. So, thank you sooo much.”

Chad

I was hesitant to hold a group workout through Google Meet to start. I did not have much faith that it would go well. I was worried about participation, them not wanting to try very hard, etc.. However, my students really bought into it and have really enjoyed working out together once or twice a week!

I believe the students are very happy to see us. I never imagined not seeing their faces for so long and when we just stop and have a pretty generic conversation at the beginning or end of class it draws them into the class. Along with this I had an 8th grade student who I never imagined to ever log in show up to start. He flipped out during an email which let me know exactly how he was feeling, and we were able to give him some help. I have continued to reach out to remind him that people really do care how he is doing. Also, Twitter has become my best resource for different ideas. I never thought Twitter would be a resource for teaching. However, this goes to show how education is changing. It shows us what the kids need to be ready for as we move out into the work world. There is definitely something to be said for face to face but as we see how easy it is to work remotely, I see our future changing as these students move out into the big world!

Dana

I started greeting each kid as they enter class and calling them by name, “Welcome Susie, I’m happy to see you today.”. I also play music as they come in that is upbeat and fun. I think that the combination of the two start my class off with some movement and with the kids feeling like they are seen, and I am happy to see them in class. I also try to find funny “dad jokes”, fun sports or health stats, and inspirational videos for them right when class starts to make it something light and fun for them to think about and engage with. I’ve also thrown in some 60 second skill challenges to get students up and moving and laughing during class. They serve as a nice break in “learning” but still allows me to talk about different skills and give students opportunities to share what they found to help them be successful.

Bailee

We have been able to implement nutrition education much more this year. With some kids moving less and dealing with social-emotional issues, proper diet can play a huge role on how the deal with those issues. Students have been able to gain a better understanding of how proper nutrition can affect their physical activity. When they have proper nutrition, they can be active longer which means the likelihood they will be able to better function in the classroom.

Chris

The best moment so far of Virtual P.E. was an email I received from a parent of a student with special needs at my school…I try my best to modify activities/lessons to meet the needs of all my students so they can all feel included in Physical Education Class, but now that it is virtual it is even tougher. During our Community Building unit I mentioned earlier: I received an email from a parent of a student, and the part of the email that stuck out was “The All about me slide was an interesting project as I needed to represent them as another regular fourth grader – it made me realize that they have interests that are not solely special needs territory. The Flipgrid assignment was daunting to even think about as they do not always give full sentences, let alone three! But we worked on it all evening, practicing the lines and I submitted the first recording! Never mind the bad lighting and mom hovering in the background, it gives me hope to push through. I know these are no biggies in the regular course of things, but these are like BIG in our world. So, thank you sooo much.”

Derrick

I was hesitant to hold a group workout through Google Meet to start. I did not have much faith that it would go well. I was worried about participation, them not wanting to try very hard, etc.. However, my students really bought into it and have really enjoyed working out together once or twice a week!

Chad

Have you found that there is anything we can take from virtual learning that would be beneficial when we get back to some form of in person learning?

Dana

I believe the biggest take away is knowing the impact you have a student’s life day in and day out. How important those relationships are to make students feel connected far outweigh the curriculum. Secondly, that anything is possible. Who would have thought that we could teach PE virtually? My department has always had a combination of online learning as well as application in the gym. This has made our transition to virtual learning much easier. I also anticipate our transition to Hybrid fairly smooth as well.

Bailee

I loved my virtual meetings with my students. I will absolutely continue to do that when I return to in person teaching. I also love the use of Flipgrid for students to submit evidence of learning. It might be less intimidating for students to be assessed that way, rather than having to perform in front of another student or their teacher. I’ve also loved being able to spend more time on the “classroom” learning that I’ve been able to do using edpuzzle and focusing more on diving deep into the Components of Fitness, FITT Principle, SMART goals, and fitness planning.

Chris

The resources that I have been able to take away from this is having my website, google classroom, and google forms. The resources are good because even though I don’t have a classroom I can still assign assignments without the hassle of paper being stored somewhere. We can continue to dive deeper into nutrition and the importance of proper diet while not missing our time on the blacktop teaching proper movement.

Derrick

I know when we eventually move back to face to face instruction that I will continue to use Google Classroom at some compacity or another. It has been so helpful pushing out asynchronous assignments through Google Classroom and promoting that development of physical literacy at home. I can easily see myself pushing out optional activities through Google Classroom that relate to our unit that they can do at home with their families. It would be a great way to promote our Physical Education Program, and another opportunity for students to take ownership of their learning.

Chad

I think this situation has highlighted how important student choice can be for motivating students. I have seen students take on new activities and find new interests during remote learning. Additionally, as students complete their physical activity logs, I have been able to connect with them about their specific interests. In the future I think it would be valuable to find ways to give students more choice and control of their learning.

As some districts across the country are moving to a hybrid version of education and many are steadfast in virtual learning, hopefully we can continue to learn and grow together, take the good with the bad, and keep providing meaningful movement opportunities for the holistic development of the young people we serve!

If you would like to stay up to date with everything Athlos we encourage you to subscribe and share, check us out on social media, and of course, be sure to check out and connect with each of these fantastic physical educators!

I believe the biggest take away is knowing the impact you have a student’s life day in and day out. How important those relationships are to make students feel connected far outweigh the curriculum. Secondly, that anything is possible. Who would have thought that we could teach PE virtually? My department has always had a combination of online learning as well as application in the gym. This has made our transition to virtual learning much easier. I also anticipate our transition to Hybrid fairly smooth as well.

Dana

I loved my virtual meetings with my students. I will absolutely continue to do that when I return to in person teaching. I also love the use of Flipgrid for students to submit evidence of learning. It might be less intimidating for students to be assessed that way, rather than having to perform in front of another student or their teacher. I’ve also loved being able to spend more time on the “classroom” learning that I’ve been able to do using edpuzzle and focusing more on diving deep into the Components of Fitness, FITT Principle, SMART goals, and fitness planning.

Bailee

The resources that I have been able to take away from this is having my website, google classroom, and google forms. The resources are good because even though I don’t have a classroom I can still assign assignments without the hassle of paper being stored somewhere. We can continue to dive deeper into nutrition and the importance of proper diet while not missing our time on the blacktop teaching proper movement.

Chris

I know when we eventually move back to face to face instruction that I will continue to use Google Classroom at some compacity or another. It has been so helpful pushing out asynchronous assignments through Google Classroom and promoting that development of physical literacy at home. I can easily see myself pushing out optional activities through Google Classroom that relate to our unit that they can do at home with their families. It would be a great way to promote our Physical Education Program, and another opportunity for students to take ownership of their learning.

Derrick

I think this situation has highlighted how important student choice can be for motivating students. I have seen students take on new activities and find new interests during remote learning. Additionally, as students complete their physical activity logs, I have been able to connect with them about their specific interests. In the future I think it would be valuable to find ways to give students more choice and control of their learning.

Chad

As some districts across the country are moving to a hybrid version of education and many are steadfast in virtual learning, hopefully we can continue to learn and grow together, take the good with the bad, and keep providing meaningful movement opportunities for the holistic development of the young people we serve!

If you would like to stay up to date with everything Athlos we encourage you to subscribe and share, check us out on social media, and of course, be sure to check out and connect with each of these fantastic physical educators!

DANA CURBY

McLean County Unit 5 School District

Dana has been teaching in Physical Education and Health for the last 20 years in Central Illinois. She graduated from Illinois State University and has her Master’s Degree in Education. In addition to her teaching experience, she spent 10 years coaching both middle and high school sports. She has spent the last 10 years at Evans Jr. High School. Dana has served as department chair at each of her schools since 2001. Dana regularly participates in a variety of professional groups and organizations. She has been on the Illinois State Advisory Board and regularly presents at IAHPERD. In addition, her department has been awarded Blue Ribbon status from IAHPERD. In 2019 she was honored to be recognized as a distinguished alumnus for her support of the PETE program at Illinois State University. Currently, she is still living in Bloomington Illinois with her spouse and two sons which allows her to play an active part at Illinois State University.

BAILEE SANDSMARK

San Dieguito Union High School District

Bailee teaches middle school Physical Education in San Diego, Ca.  She is a Certified Strength & Conditioning Specialist (CSCS), a high school & 10u softball coach, and the San Diego Representative for CAHPERD.  She is a presenter at local, state, and virtual conferences, sharing her love for Physical Education and technology use in PE.

DERRICK BIEHL

Indian Prairie School District 204

Derrick is starting his 4th year teaching Elementary Physical Education at Patterson Elementary School in Naperville Illinois. He is a huge proponent of integrating technology in order to enhance his daily lessons. Derrick has presented at multiple P.E. Workshops & Conferences on how and why to incorporate technology into physical education. In 2019 he was named Northeastern District of IAHPERD’s Young Professional of the Year. He is constantly striving to improve his craft and loves to learn from colleagues who are passionate about education.

CHRIS TAMEZ

Folsom Cordova Unified School District

Chris began his career out of college as a Strength and Conditioning coach in the private sector as well as coaching high school football. Chris then transitioned into college strength and conditioning. After about two years in the field he realized he belonged at the K-12 level where he can impact more kids early on with the teaching of proper movement. Currently, Chris teaches PE and coaches football in the Sacramento, California area. He bases his teaching around the Long-Term Athletic Development Model. He also runs the strength program and coaches football at El Camino High School.

CHAD AUBIN

McLean County Unit 5 School District

Chad has been teaching physical education, at every level, for nearly a decade. He started his career coaching college track & field. He has continued coaching track & field and cross county at the college, high school, and junior high levels. Currently he teaches at Normal West High School and serves as the Head Coach for the boys track & field team, as well as the cross country team. Chad is nearing the completion of a master’s degree in Physical Education Pedagogy. He is passionate about helping students to find value and joy in movement and in health.

DANA CURBY

McLean County Unit 5 School District

Dana has been teaching in Physical Education and Health for the last 20 years in Central Illinois. She graduated from Illinois State University and has her Master’s Degree in Education. In addition to her teaching experience, she spent 10 years coaching both middle and high school sports. She has spent the last 10 years at Evans Jr. High School. Dana has served as department chair at each of her schools since 2001. Dana regularly participates in a variety of professional groups and organizations. She has been on the Illinois State Advisory Board and regularly presents at IAHPERD. In addition, her department has been awarded Blue Ribbon status from IAHPERD. In 2019 she was honored to be recognized as a distinguished alumnus for her support of the PETE program at Illinois State University. Currently, she is still living in Bloomington Illinois with her spouse and two sons which allows her to play an active part at Illinois State University.

BAILEE SANDSMARK

San Dieguito Union High School District

Bailee teaches middle school Physical Education in San Diego, Ca.  She is a Certified Strength & Conditioning Specialist (CSCS), a high school & 10u softball coach, and the San Diego Representative for CAHPERD.  She is a presenter at local, state, and virtual conferences, sharing her love for Physical Education and technology use in PE.

DERRICK BIEHL

Indian Prairie School District 204

Derrick is starting his 4th year teaching Elementary Physical Education at Patterson Elementary School in Naperville Illinois. He is a huge proponent of integrating technology in order to enhance his daily lessons. Derrick has presented at multiple P.E. Workshops & Conferences on how and why to incorporate technology into physical education. In 2019 he was named Northeastern District of IAHPERD’s Young Professional of the Year. He is constantly striving to improve his craft and loves to learn from colleagues who are passionate about education.

CHRIS TAMEZ

Folsom Cordova Unified School District

Chris began his career out of college as a Strength and Conditioning coach in the private sector as well as coaching high school football. Chris then transitioned into college strength and conditioning. After about two years in the field he realized he belonged at the K-12 level where he can impact more kids early on with the teaching of proper movement. Currently, Chris teaches PE and coaches football in the Sacramento, California area. He bases his teaching around the Long-Term Athletic Development Model. He also runs the strength program and coaches football at El Camino High School.

CHAD AUBIN

McLean County Unit 5 School District

Chad has been teaching physical education, at every level, for nearly a decade. He started his career coaching college track & field. He has continued coaching track & field and cross county at the college, high school, and junior high levels. Currently he teaches at Normal West High School and serves as the Head Coach for the boys track & field team, as well as the cross country team. Chad is nearing the completion of a master’s degree in Physical Education Pedagogy. He is passionate about helping students to find value and joy in movement and in health.

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